Semester in Review: 2010 on the John J. Burns Library’s Blog

Connolly Book of Hours, John J. Burns Library, MS1986-097, Gift of Terence L. Connolly. This is an illuminated manuscript made in France in the fifteenth century.

Connolly Book of Hours, John J. Burns Library, MS.1986.097, Gift of Terence L. Connolly. This is an illuminated manuscript made in France in the fifteenth century.

As 2010 comes to a close, I’d like to take this opportunity to thank the Burns Library staff members and student employees who contributed to this blog.  Of course, we couldn’t do this without  our faithful readers, so thanks also to everyone who reads the blog regularly!  After our  first few introductory posts in July and August 2010,  we went into the academic year with posts featuring a variety of topics, including the Irish Music Center, Hutter’s Variant Font Old Testament from 1577, processing John J. McAleer’s Papers and a testimonial by a student working in the Burns Library Reading Room.

In October, our posts presented a variety of book and manuscript collections, including the Drinan Papers, the John Wieners-Charles Olson Papers, Edward Gorey books from the library of Graham Greene and Hilaire Belloc’s Cautionary Tales.

In November, we highlighted the changing of the tapestry in the Ford Tower, the joint Boston College Libraries and ACRL Women’s Studies Interest Group Cuala Press event, recipes from the Burns Library’s collections for Thanksgiving,  our “Writing from the Irish Language Tradition” exhibition and Norah Lindsay’s postcards from the Belloc Papers.

Cuala Press Cards from the Cuala Press Printed Materials Collection, MS2005-35, John J. Burns Library, Boston College. Photograph by Gary Wayne Gilbert.

Cuala Press Cards from the Cuala Press Printed Materials Collection, MS.2005.035, John J. Burns Library, Boston College. Photograph by Gary Wayne Gilbert.

Last, but not least, in December we spread some holiday cheer with Christmas cards from the Cuala Press Printed Materials Collection and delved into a fascinating story from the Information Wanted Database.   If you have any suggestions for a post, please send your ideas to me – justine.sundaram@bc.edu.  Look for our next post on a recent Beckett acquisition in January 2011, but until then best wishes for the holiday season and a Happy New Year!

About John J. Burns Library of Rare Books and Special Collections at Boston College

The University’s special collections, including the University’s Archives, are housed in the Honorable John J. Burns Library, located in the Bapst Library Building, north entrance. Burns Library staff work with students and faculty to support learning and teaching at Boston College, offering access to unique primary sources through instruction sessions, exhibits, and programming. The Burns Library also serves the research needs of external scholars, hosting researchers from around the globe interested in using the collections. The Burns Library is home to more than 200,000 volumes and over 700 manuscript collections, including holdings of music, photographic materials, art and artifacts, and ephemera. Though its collections cover virtually the entire spectrum of human knowledge, the Burns Library has achieved international recognition in several specific areas of research, most notably: Irish studies; British Catholic authors; Jesuitica; Fine printing; Catholic liturgy and life in America, 1925-1975; Boston history; the Caribbean, especially Jamaica; Nursing; and Congressional archives.
This entry was posted in Archives & Manuscripts, Conservation, Digital Projects, Exhibits & Events, Featured Collections & Books, Staff Posts and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Semester in Review: 2010 on the John J. Burns Library’s Blog

  1. Kelly says:

    This has been a joy to read–looking forward to seeing your great work in 2011!

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