Semester in Review: Burns Blog Fall 2011

Illustration from Flann O'Brien's copy of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe. Flann O’Brien's Library, John J. Burns Library, Boston College.

Illustration from Flann O’Brien’s copy of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe. Flann O’Brien’s Library, John J. Burns Library, Boston College. Image from Shelley Barber’s Talk Like a Pirate Day post on September 19, 2011.

Dear Burns Library Blog Readers,

It’s the end of another great semester here at Boston College and I’d like to take this opportunity to thank you for reading the John J. Burns Library’s blog this semester and to review the posts by our wonderful staff members and student employees whose contributions have made the blog so engaging this semester.  In September, Katie Lyle gave us a post on the advertisements from a different era in the Heights, Shelley Barber celebrated Talk Like a Pirate Day with books and manuscripts from the Burns Library’s collections and Andrew Kuhn told some stories from the Dublin Penny Journal.

A sample of publications among the Burns Library Irish collection that relate to the reprieve petition featured in the Cataloger's Corner post by Meaghan Madden from October 17, 2011.

A sample of publications among the Burns Library Irish Collection that relate to the reprieve petition featured in the Cataloger’s Corner post by Meaghan Madden from October 17, 2011.

In October, Shelley Barber wrote about the story behind the Richard King stained glass windows, Barbara Adams Hebard related her experiences helping the McMullen Museum with the Making History exhibit, Meaghan Madden highlighted a petition begging a reprieve for six convicted IRA men and books related to this topic from the Burns Irish Collection, Katie Lyle examined a controversial production of Beckett’s play Endgame by the American Repertory Theater and Kathy Williams showed us some frighteningly good research with her Irish Gothic research guide.

In November,  Barbara Adams Hebard wrote of classes, bindings and learning in the Conservation Lab, Robert Williams narrated the exciting adventures of Captain Blood, James Daryn Henry paid tribute to noted theologian Frans Jozef van Beeck, S. J. and Andrew Kuhn updated us on the latest exhibit at the Burns Library.

In December,  Shelley Barber ushered in the holiday spirit with some beautiful holy cards from the Norman Castle Holy Card Collection and Catherine Macek wrote a fascinating report on her work as the Bookbuilders of Boston intern here at the John J. Burns Library.

Here you see the book Auctor operum sequentium complete with its clasps.

Here you see the book Auctor operum sequentium complete with its clasps, BR65 .A31 1492 Oversize. Photo from Catherine Macek’s post on December 12, 2011.

From next week until classes begin in January 2012, the Burns Library’s blog will be on hiatus so we can gather more wonderful posts for you to enjoy.  In the meantime, please peruse any older posts that you may have missed and be sure to subscribe to the blog so that the Burns Library’s blog post can be delivered directly to your inbox!  Any comments, suggestions or ideas for posts are most welcome and should be sent to me at justine.sundaram@bc.edu.

Again, many thanks to all blog readers and post authors for your time, attention and engagement.  It is most sincerely appreciated.  Best wishes to all for the holiday season!

Fondly,

  • Justine Sundaram, Reference Librarian, John J. Burns Library

About John J. Burns Library of Rare Books and Special Collections at Boston College

Located in the original Bapst Library building on Boston College's Chestnut Hill campus, the John J. Burns Library offers students, scholars, and the general public opportunities to engage with rare books, special collections, and archives.
This entry was posted in Archives & Manuscripts, Art at the Burns Library, Blog in Review, Conservation, Exhibits & Events, Flickr Sets, University Archives and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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