Secrets of 15th Century European Paper Revealed

On Thursday, October 4th, 2012, at 4 p.m.  in the Burns Library's Thompson Room, Paper Specialist Tim Barrett will give a presentation on paper-making.  RSVP to Barbara Adams Hebard, barbara.hebard@bc.edu.

On Thursday, October 4th, 2012, at 4 p.m. in the Burns Library’s Thompson Room, Paper Specialist Tim Barrett will give a presentation on paper-making. RSVP to Barbara Adams Hebard, barbara.hebard@bc.edu.

The light color and still supple qualities of paper made in Italy and Germany at the time of Gutenberg has intrigued rare book librarians and paper historians for generations. Why is paper of the period so stable and long lasting as compared to the paper made in subsequent centuries?   New research by the University of Iowa Center for the Book, Paper Specialist, Tim Barrett and his colleagues has uncovered some of the answers. On this Thursday, October 4th, at 4 p.m. in the Burns Library’s Thompson Room, Barrett will highlight the most important results of the research and will also share details of new research on Islamic style papermaking techniques undertaken by his students. Paper specimens will be on display and questions from the audience will be warmly encouraged.  Space in the Thompson Room is limited so please RSVP to Barbara Hebard, barbara.hebard@bc.edu.  This event is free and open to the public.

Timothy Barrett in the Special Collections section of The University of Iowa Library in Iowa City, Iowa on September 17, 2009. (Stephen Mally/Getty Images)

Timothy Barrett in the Special Collections section of The University of Iowa Library in Iowa City, Iowa on September 17, 2009. (Stephen Mally/Getty Images)

Timothy Barrett received his BA from Antioch College in 1973. His career includes two years at Twinrocker Handmade Paper, Inc. in Brookston, Indiana, two years under a Fulbright Fellowship studying papermaking in Japan, and two years of part time study at Western Michigan University.  His  research on early European handmade papers have been funded by the NEA, the Kress Foundation, the Institute for Museum and Library Services and a MacArthur Fellowship. Barrett is author of books, videotapes and articles on the history, technique and aesthetics of hand papermaking. He joined the University of Iowa Center for the Book as a Paper Specialist in 1986 and was director of the Center between 1996 and 2002 and also from the Fall of 2012.

This is event is sponsored by the Institute for Liberal Arts, the Fine Arts Department and the Norma Jean Calderwood University Professorship of Islamic and Asian Art, and the Boston College University Libraries.

About John J. Burns Library of Rare Books and Special Collections at Boston College

The University’s special collections, including the University’s Archives, are housed in the Honorable John J. Burns Library, located in the Bapst Library Building, north entrance. Burns Library staff work with students and faculty to support learning and teaching at Boston College, offering access to unique primary sources through instruction sessions, exhibits, and programming. The Burns Library also serves the research needs of external scholars, hosting researchers from around the globe interested in using the collections. The Burns Library is home to more than 200,000 volumes and over 700 manuscript collections, including holdings of music, photographic materials, art and artifacts, and ephemera. Though its collections cover virtually the entire spectrum of human knowledge, the Burns Library has achieved international recognition in several specific areas of research, most notably: Irish studies; British Catholic authors; Jesuitica; Fine printing; Catholic liturgy and life in America, 1925-1975; Boston history; the Caribbean, especially Jamaica; Nursing; and Congressional archives.
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