Rev. James H. Murphy, C.M., Burns Visiting Scholar For Fall Semester 2015

James Murphy, Professor of DePaul University's College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences is pictured in a studio portrait Monday, Feb. 9, 2015. (DePaul University/Jeff Carrion)

James Murphy, Professor of DePaul University’s College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences is pictured in a studio portrait Monday, Feb. 9, 2015. (DePaul University/Jeff Carrion)

The John J. Burns Library welcomes Rev. James H. Murphy, C.M., Professor of English at DePaul University, Chicago, as the Burns Visiting Scholar in Irish Studies for the fall 2015 semester. A graduate of the National University of Ireland, Maynooth, he has also earned degrees from Heythrop College of the University of London, Trinity College Dublin, and the National University of Ireland. Since 2009 he has been a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Professor Murphy’s impressive list of publications includes: Catholic Fiction and Social Reality in Ireland, 1873-1922, (Greenwood, Westport, CT, 1972), Abject Loyalty: Nationalism and Monarchy in Ireland During the Reign of Queen Victoria (Cork: Cork University Press, 2001), Ireland: A Social, Cultural and Literary History, 1791-1891 (Dublin: Four Courts, 2003), Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011). Murphy has also edited or co-edited an additional eight books. A book in progress is tentatively entitled Ireland’s Czar: Gladstonian Government and the Lord Lieutenancies of the Red Earl Spencer, 1868-1886.

Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age by James H. Murphy, PR8801 .M87 2011, O'Neill Library, Boston College

Irish Novelists and the Victorian Age by James H. Murphy, PR8801 .M87 2011, O’Neill Library, Boston College

Reflecting his interest and expertise in both Irish literature and history, Murphy has contributed to several dozen professional journals and books. As a multidisciplinary scholar, he has published widely on issues of gender and sexuality. His primary focus, however, is the political, social, and cultural history of the so-called “long century” (1791-1922).

This semester, Professor Murphy will teach the advanced topic seminar: “Irish Victorian Fiction.”

On Wednesday, November 18, at 4:30 p.m. in the Thompson Room of Burns Library, Professor Murphy will deliver a public lecture titled “Novelists and Politicians in Nineteenth-Century Ireland.” It will be immediately followed by a reception in the Burns Library Irish Room. All are welcome to attend. For further information, please contact Maureen McVeigh at maureen.mcveigh@bc.edu or call (617) 552-3282.

About John J. Burns Library of Rare Books and Special Collections at Boston College

The University’s special collections, including the University’s Archives, are housed in the Honorable John J. Burns Library, located in the Bapst Library Building, north entrance. Burns Library staff work with students and faculty to support learning and teaching at Boston College, offering access to unique primary sources through instruction sessions, exhibits, and programming. The Burns Library also serves the research needs of external scholars, hosting researchers from around the globe interested in using the collections. The Burns Library is home to more than 200,000 volumes and over 700 manuscript collections, including holdings of music, photographic materials, art and artifacts, and ephemera. Though its collections cover virtually the entire spectrum of human knowledge, the Burns Library has achieved international recognition in several specific areas of research, most notably: Irish studies; British Catholic authors; Jesuitica; Fine printing; Catholic liturgy and life in America, 1925-1975; Boston history; the Caribbean, especially Jamaica; Nursing; and Congressional archives.
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