Tag Archives: making history public

Hilaire Belloc: Correspondence and Family

This sampling of correspondence between Hilaire Belloc, notable British author of the twentieth century, and his son Louis, a pilot for the 84th Field Company of the Royal Flying Corps, the antecedent to the Royal Air Force, provides insight into … Continue reading

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The Harsh Realities of War

These images were taken by German soldier, H. A. Reinhold and are part of the H.A. Reinhold Papers, 1908-1997. A native of Hamburg Germany, Reinhold chronicled his war experience by taking pictures throughout Europe. Although many of his images captured the … Continue reading

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A Year in Review: 2015-2016

Hello, readers! Thank you for another academic year of following the John J. Burns Library blog. Over the summer we like to take a look back at what has been posted throughout the year both to thank our authors and … Continue reading

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The Pride of the Jordanians: Petra

The year 1812 saw a milestone event in the history of Near Eastern travel. After centuries of having been lost to the outside world, the ancient Nabataean city of Petra was rediscovered by Swiss explorer Johann Ludwig Burckhardt – found … Continue reading

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From the Heart of National Politics to the Core of Culture: The Louvre

For more than eight centuries, the “Palais du Louvre” has overlooked the Right Bank of the River Seine, silently narrating France’s political and cultural development. The building epitomizes the adaptation of monumental structures necessary for their material permanence. Recognizing the … Continue reading

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Big Ben’s Ancestors: John Britton and Gothic Revival Architecture

  Big Ben dominates London’s skyline as part of the most monumental and recognizable building in Britain. Surrounding the famous clock tower, Westminster Palace immediately evokes Britain’s ancient majesty. However, the structure is just over 150 years old. Erected in … Continue reading

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The Americano Grand Tour: A Young American’s Journey Across Europe

Frederick Wilton Russell was an atypical albeit lucky American teenager. In the late 19th century, he embarked on a European expedition with his family, which could be considered an American form of the “Grand Tour.” As was customary at the … Continue reading

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Do We Really Care?: Early student activism in the 1960s

Have Boston College students truly been men and women for others? Despite the physical changes, the university’s purpose and message have largely remained constant. Beginning in the 1840s, those who envisioned Boston College wanted to improve the lives of Irish … Continue reading

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Why Boston College Got Ugly: Explaining postwar construction

For more than four decades, the Chestnut Hill grounds of Boston College remained an astoundingly beautiful, Gothic-inspired campus. Critics noted Gasson Hall’s national influence among Gothic revivalism at universities, and, in 1926, Devlin Hall was recognized as “the most beautiful … Continue reading

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Sink or Swim: How the Sinking of Lower Campus in 1867 saved the Future of Boston College

Boston College has not always been a sprawling campus divided between lower, middle, and upper campuses. In fact, the entirety of lower campus was underwater in 1948 when the college purchased the “Lawrence Basin” Reservoir from the City of Boston. … Continue reading

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